Piney River Brewing Company

Archive for the ‘The Beer’ Category

Going to Kansas City, Kansas City Here Piney River Comes

In The Beer on October 20, 2016 at 10:45 pm

Amazing things can happen in Kansas City.

On May 17, 1997 Brian and I traveled to KC for our first Kansas City Royals baseball game.  We were celebrating our first anniversary with a few days in KC.

The Royals were playing the Tigers.  The Royals weren’t as well regarded in baseball at the time.  Since we avidly followed the St. Louis Cardinals and the National League, we really didn’t know much about the Royals or the Tigers, but we were at a baseball game together. And we loved baseball.  Kaufman Stadium was really beautiful, too, with the fountains in the outfield.

We had excellent seats…a few rows up, behind home plate.  I don’t remember if the seats were really easily available, or if we just got them off a scalper.  Either way, the seats were great, and we could hear the thwack of the bat connecting with the ball and the thud of the ball into the glove way better than on TV.

At some point in the game a foul ball was hit back, up and over the net, behind home plate, and it came spinning down toward us.  The guy next to me stuck his hand out.  Smack!  A quick deflection into Brian’s outstretched hands also next to me.

Just like that, Brian had a foul ball!

He raised it up…you know, like guys do when they get the ball, and then he gave it me.  Congratulations rang out around us.  An usher ran down to make sure we were okay.  The guy next to me massaged his baseball stung but empty hand.

You have to understand that 20-something Brian Durham was completely stoked about this foul ball.  He grew up on baseball, playing baseball, rooting on the Philadelphia Phillies and going to Phillies games as a child with his glove in tow.  Never did he get a foul ball. He came close one time, but an adult man got the ball.  (And Brian still remembers that.) This was before the days of smart phones and social media, so we weren’t able to tell our friends in real time, but as soon as we could, we told the story of Brian’s amazing foul ball catch in Kansas City.

Brian went on to get lots more foul balls–one at Dodger Stadium, one off Albert Bell’s bat at Tiger Stadium (before they tore it down), and a couple of home runs balls, too.  Turns out, the closer you sit to the field, it’s easier to get baseballs at a game….  But we have never forgotten that night in KC when we went home with a real, live foul ball.

We’ve spent lots of fun times in KC since that game.  Most recently, we’ve been the guests of our friends at Boulevard Brewing at Boulevardia.  Definitely the most fun you can have sweating and pouring beer at the same time!

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Boulevardia 2016! Brian and Joleen (right couple) and Amber Powell, our brewer, and Peter Jankowski, (Amber’s domestic partner).

Since 2011 we’ve been asked about getting Piney River beer to KC on a regular basis.  Since we grew the brewery here on the Farm last year, Kansas City has been in our sights.  We wanted to be able to provide lots of high quality, award winning beer when we knew we wouldn’t run out.  The time is finally right.  We’re very pleased to announce that next week we are shipping beer to our new distribution partner, North Kansas City Beverage.north-kc-beverage-logo

We started talking with NKC Beverage in the spring.  Again, NKC Beverage is a smaller, family-owned distribution company.  It’s the type of distributor with whom Piney River seems to find a good groove.  Brian Duff and Chad Borland visited the BARn in June, and we showed them around and hashed out what a partnership with Piney River would look like.

This summer Brian and I were figuring out the whole 16-ounce/12-ounce can thing, and we determined the best way to send out beer to KC would be launch in the new 12-ounce cans.  Not that KC folks aren’t as thirsty as the rest of the state, it just made sense for NKC Bev to start off with our new package rather than transition into it shortly after launching our brand. img_1532

These will begin appearing at your favorite liquor stores and retail locations next week.  If you like Piney River, tell your local retailer to order some in for your drinking enjoyment.  Draft beer is also being sent and will pop up in select locations, too.  Stay tuned…we will also have some Piney River event dates to announce for you very soon.

We’re really pleased to be part of the NKC Beverage family, and we thank Chad and his crew for their interest in growing local craft beer in KC and in taking on the Piney River brand.  Thanks for your patience in waiting for our brand, Kansas City!  Let’s get together for a beer real soon!  We’re looking forward to more amazing memories made in KC.joleen-and-brian-barn-1

Honey, I Shrunk the Piney River Cans

In The Beer on October 12, 2016 at 10:11 pm

Today was a cloudy, rainy day on the Piney River Farm; not too different from the cloudy, rainy night in 2011 when Piney River first canned craft beer in the Ozarks. Today’s first–12 ounce Piney River cans.

Those of us that have been canning beer on the Farm are still trying to adjust to these smaller cans in our hands, but we’re doing what many of our consumers and our distributors have asked us to do by putting our beer in a smaller can.

Waaay back in 2011 when Piney River was the first microbrewery in the state to can beer at their brewery, we were following suit with the 16-ounce pint can like our craft beer brothers and sisters in the Midwest—Tallgrass, Surly, Sun King. We’re in the Show Me state, why not show our customer a true pint? Plus, it was perfect—the Piney Pint.

Back then, there wasn’t much canned craft beer on the shelves in 2011 and 2012 or even 2013, but now canned beer is growing by leaps and bounds, and breweries that were once only bottling their beer are now canning it, too. Twelve-ounce cans are easier to source, plus, if you were a brewery already packing 12-ounce beers, it only makes sense to continue that in a can form. And now, it’s easier to find 12-ounce cans on the shelf here in the Ozarks than it is possible to find 16-ounce cans on the shelf.

I even had a conversation with a fellow brewer that packaged beer in 16-ounce cans and started packaging certain beers in 12-ounce cans for grocery stores. He thinks that it will ultimately lead to the demise of his 16-ounce canned beers.

Our distributors were also asking for 12-ounce cans from Piney River. For those distributors that sold 12-ounce/6-packs and 16-ounce/4-packs, they felt like they could sell more cases of 6-packs than 4-packs. Truly, a case of 6-packs equals four purchases to be empty the case, and a case of 4-packs require six purchases to empty the case. Plus, we’re hearing about this issue that the consumer can’t generally do the math that even though a 4-pack usually costs less than a 6-pack, all the consumer sees is 6 beers versus 4 beers.

And while we love floating down the Big Piney with pint of Piney in our koozie, we have heard from some of you that your 16-ounce beer gets warm before you finish it. Can we suggest here that you drink just a wee bit faster, perhaps? Just an idea….But never fear, your warm beer concerns have also been heard!

So, raise those Piney pints high in the air (or save them for your beer collection); either way, they are going away.

Today, we canned Piney River’s Black Walnut Wheat in 12-ounce cans, and that will be followed up by 12-ounce versions of all of our core beers in the coming weeks. Depending upon your distribution market and the stock of 16-ounce beers your distributor has in place, you will see 12-ounce 6-packs of Piney River beer in your favorite drink-buying place very soon or shortly down the road.

In the upcoming months, you will also see us release “Raise a Ruckus” (an Imperial Stout) and 2017 Mule Team Imperial IPA in 12-ounce 4-packs. We thought 10% ABV might be a little more easy drinking in the smaller sized can, and we can keep it at a good price point, too.

Four brands will remain in 16-ounce cans until we run out of the blank pounders. Masked Bandit IPA and Old Tom Porter are two brands you already know well. Two new Piney River offerings in 16-ounce 4-packs will be River Access Ozarks Lager and Aux Arcs Dry-Hopped Saison.

Same delicious Piney River beer. Same commitment to quality. Same love of what we do…just in a smaller package and lots more of them.

Cheers!

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Chchchchanges Coming in 2017

In The BARn, The Beer on September 21, 2016 at 10:59 am

We are so excited to bring you the Piney River Brewing Company 2017 release calendar!

Twelve ounce cans are headed your way! There will be more information about that later, and actual 12 oz cans sooner rather than later, too. Stay tuned for that!

We are releasing–in limited quantities–new canned beers throughout the year. They are Raise a Ruckus Imperial Stout, River Access Ozarks Lager and Aux Arcs Saison. 

And that foeder, those barrels, the original BARn is officially where we’ve got the funk going on.  The first of our Farm Raised Funk was Lizzie Twister, the first funkified beer from the BARn.  We plan to release even more Farm Raised Funk in 2017.

Thank you so much for raising a pint with us in 2016.  None of this would be possible without your incredible support. Let’s raise a few more together in the upcoming year!


Cheers!

Piney River Brewing Wins Two Medals at the US Beer Open Championship

In The Beer on August 8, 2016 at 10:18 pm

IMG_1235Piney River Brewing recently won two bronze medals at the US Open Beer Championship for their Black Walnut Wheat and Bronzeback Pale Ale beers.

The US Open Beer Championship is held annually in Oxford, OH. Over 5,000 beers from around the world were entered in 90 different beer style categories. The contest is open to professional brewers and home brewers. US Open judges hail from England, Canada and the US.

Black Walnut Wheat won in the “American Wheat Dark” category. This American-style wheat beer is dark in color and is brewed with hand harvested black walnuts.   The beer features an aroma of black walnuts and finishes with a black walnut flavor.

This is the second year in a row that Black Walnut Wheat has placed in the US Beer Open Championship. In 2015, Piney River took home a silver in the American Wheat Dark category for the beer.

According to Joleen Senter Durham, co-founder of Piney River Brewing, Black Walnut Wheat is the flagship beer of the Ozarks brewery. “No matter where it’s sold, Black Walnut Wheat is always our most popular beer,” Durham said. “It’s easy to drink, and the black walnuts in the beer provide an interesting aroma and flavor profile.”

Bronzeback Pale Ale won in the “International Pale Ale” category. This American-style pale ale is pale yellow in color and features a lot of flavor and aroma from multiple hop additions during brewing and after fermentation is complete. Galaxy and Citra are the featured hops in Bronzeback Pale Ale.

“Bronzeback is one of my favorite beers to brew and to drink,” Brian Durham, head brewer and co-founder of Piney River Brewing, said. “This beer is crisp in flavor and has great hop aroma.”

This is the first award for Bronzeback Pale Ale.

Amber Powell is lead brewer at Piney River Brewing. Powell oversaw the production and packaging of both beers that placed in the competition.

“It thrills Joleen and I to bring more recognition to craft beer being made right here in the Ozarks,” Brian Durham said. “Amber and the staff here are consistently turning out great beer.”

Piney River Brewing is located on Durham’s 80-acre farm, operating out of a restored 75-year old barn and a larger barn. The Durhams founded the brewery in 2010 with a 10-gallon brewing system. In 2015, Piney River Brewing produced over 2,200 barrels of beer, and completed a $1.2 million expansion on the farm, allowing the brewery to increase production with a new brew house, canning line and cold storage.

Piney River Brewing operates a tasting room that is open to the public every weekend. The brewery has distribution throughout most of Missouri and Arkansas.

A complete list of US Open Beer Championship winners can be found at www.usopenbeer.com.

 

First of the Piney River Farm Raised Beers…Lizzie Twister

In The BARn, The Beer on August 4, 2016 at 10:58 pm

We’ve made a new beer that’s selling like hot cakes this summer in the tap room. Lizzie Twister is a Berliner-style weisse beer which means that it’s a style of wheat beer traditionally made in Germany. In fact, a Berliner weisse is a tart wheat beer. This style of beer is also traditionally low ABV, so Lizzie is a mere 4% which is nice and easy on a hot day in the Ozarks.

To make this beer, we brewed the beer then pithed lactobacillus into the beer while it was in the fermentation vessel. The lactobacillus when used properly gives the beer a slightly tart flavor.

This is the first beer of this type that we’ve made. We needed to wait until we had a separate brewing space for beers that have things like lactobacillus in them. That’s what we’re using our first brew space–the BARn–for these days. And we’re calling these beers “Farm Raised”.

Right now Lizzie Twister is only in kegs, so we’ve had it at some events like the Springfield Craft Beer Bash and a St. Louis Craft Beer Week tap takeover at Three Kings in Des Peres. We’ll have it at the Great Arkansas Beer Fest this weekend. And we’re serving up pints of it all weekend, every weekend at the BARn tap room. We’re filling cr0wlers and growlers with it, too.

So let me tell you a little story about how the name Lizzie Twister came to be…

Waaay back, a long time ago, maybe even back in our home brewer days, Brian and I heard about this spot on the Big Piney River. This spot is upstream from us. It’s not even a spot we know well, but the spot has a great name…Lizzie Twister.

Brian and I both remember seeing that name on a river map and thinking to ourselves and saying to each other, “That would be a great beer name.” So we tucked Lizzie Twister away for a long time until the “right” beer came along that should be named Lizzie Twister.

Got a slightly tart, easy drinking beer? Got the name Lizzie Twister? Seemed like a match made in heaven.

If you’re like us, you know there isn’t a hill or holler or river bend in the Ozarks that isn’t named something for some reason. How in the world did a spot on the Big Piney River get named Lizzie Twister? Here’s what we’ve been told:

The Jackson Brothers were at wit’s end. Their raft had hung up in the bend below Hell’s Roaring Rocky Shoals on the Big Piney. It was hot, the river had been low, and now they were faced with untangling the mess that had occurred that day.

It was late in the day, they had some homebrew and food along, so they decided to just build a small campfire before dark, heat up some beans, have a brew or two before bedtime, and tackle their problem in the morning.

Right before getting the bedrolls out, there was a noise in the woods next to the gravel bar. They wondered what kind of critter would be coming toward the fire and the voices.

Out of the woods stepped Lizzie from Hazleton Springs. She had heard the voices from up river, walked down to check the boys out. The Jackson Brothers knew her well.

“Hey, Lizzie, we are in a jam,” they said. “Our raft is all twisted up. Can you help?”

Lizzie gave the boys a sly look from corner of her eyes. She clucked her tongue, put her hands on her hips and asked, “It depends. Do you have any Hot Date Ale in a can?”

And all the problems were solved.

The End.

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If you come to the BARn to try Lizzie Twister, you can enjoy it plain or with a shot of fruit syrup (which is also traditionally added to Berliner weisse beers in Germany). From left to right we’ve got Blackberry Lizzie Twister; Peach Lizzie Twister; Raspberry Lizzie Twister, or just the unflavored version of Lizzie Twister.

Missouri’s Craft Brewers Oppose Big Beer Bill in Missouri Legislature

In The Beer on May 1, 2016 at 10:03 am

Members of the Missouri Small Brewers Guild have fought against “big beer” successfully throughout the spring legislative session only to see Anheuser Busch-In Bev (ABI) successfully amend their legislation to a wine-related bill on Thursday afternoon.
Originally proposed as SB 919, ABI sought legislation allowing them to lease coolers to convenience stores and grocery stores across the state. Missouri Brewers Guild members testified and spoke out against SB 919, and the bill passed the Senate after much debate and with only one vote.

With just two weeks remaining on the legislative calendar and SB 919 not scheduled to be heard on the House floor, ABI made a last-ditch effort by putting an amendment with the same legislation on SB 994 which passed in the House. With the new amendments, the bill is slated to go back to the Senate for debate and a vote.

“SB 919 and the cooler amendment on SB 994 are bad for Missouri’s craft brewers and the 4,300 people that we employee across our state,” Jeff Schrag, Missouri Small Brewers Guild president and owner of Mother’s Brewing Company in Springfield, MO said.

Schrag explained that in Missouri’s three-tier distribution system a company like ABI has never been allowed to provide refrigeration to retailers. “This is a move to erode the three-tier system in our state,” Schrag said.

“Allowing ABI to lease coolers creates an unlevel playing field, and pushes us out of the market,” Schrag said. “When was the last time you saw Pepsi products in a Coca-Cola cooler?”
Representative Keith English, I-Florrisant, spoke against the amendment and is a supporter of Missouri’s craft beer industry.

“The reason why Anheuser Busch-In Bev had this bill is because they are losing market share, and the only way they can get back in is to buy these coolers,” English said. “This is a horrible bill. It is not for any small business; the only reason why we had this is so that the big business here in downtown St. Louis can get a little more of their market share.”

“Ironically, the original sponsor of this cooler legislation and many people that have voted for this legislation are heavily supported by ABI in their upcoming election and re-election bids,” Brian Durham, Missouri Small Brewers Guild member and owner, head brewer and co-founder of Piney River Brewing Company in Bucyrus, MO, said.

Durham asserts that he has placed all of his available capital in growing a small business in rural Missouri, and he doesn’t have the funding to purchase coolers to lease to retailers. Piney River Brewing just completed a $1.3 million expansion in South Central Missouri. 

“Missouri’s craft breweries are rapidly growing small businesses in our state. Collectively, we employ more Missourians than ABI,” Durham said. “If our legislators vote in favor of SB 994 they are voting against Missouri’s entrepreneurs, against Missouri’s small business leaders.” 

ABI coolers are allowed in retail locations in some states such as Colorado and Wisconsin, but Schrag has heard personally from the brewers’ guilds in those states that the ABI coolers are a detriment to craft beer growth in the states where they are allowed.

“This is truly a case of ‘David and Goliath’ in Missouri,” Schrag said. “Since January Missouri’s independent craft brewery owners and brewers have been fighting against a giant, multinational behemoth with dozens of paid lobbyists and slick public relations campaigns to retailers and legislators.”

Shrag and members of the guild are hopeful that with two weeks left in the legislative session SB 994 and the cooler amendment will not find its way back to the Senate floor.

“We are asking all of Missouri’s craft breweries and anyone that enjoys partaking of Missouri craft beer to contact their Senator and tell them to vote ‘no’ on SB 994,” Schrag said. “This bill is bad for Missouri craft beer.”

How the Piney River Seventh Trumpet Came to Be

In The Beer on April 1, 2016 at 10:48 pm

At the 5th Aleiversary we were able to share our first Imperial Stout with you–Seventh Trumpet. This isn’t just any stout; this stout has a story that you really need to know.

In late 2014, The Home Brewery in Ozark, MO contacted us regarding the annual Zymurgists of the Ozarks homebrew  competition. They asked is we would be willing to judge the winning beers of the competition and choose a favorite to brew with the winning homebrewer.  

Brian and I started out as home brewers, and we have great respect for some of the homebrewers that we know that brew great beers.  We agreed to participate.

The winter weather was not in our favor in 2015, but finally the “winter warmer” competition made its way to the BARn where we gathered in late February with our brewing staff to try beers and declare a #1. 

Michael Wells of Kansas City was the winner. Michael calls his homebrewing adventures Eye for an Eye, and let me tell you, if you’re ever offered a bottle of homebrew with one of these on the top, do not turn it down. 

 Michael’s winning brew was a Russian Imperial Stout called Seventh Trumpet, and the winning version was brewed with coffee beans and vanilla beans.  It was the unanimous winner amongst us and our staff trying all of the top finishing beers.  Not only is Michael a solid homebrewer, he’s a really nice guy, too.  And that’s a good thing because by the time Michael’s beer won the competition, we were deep into a excavating, concrete pouring and a construction project that consumed our life for most of 2015.  

Finally, after the holidays, after we had our new brew house up and going, but before we were wrapped up in 2016 beer events, we were able to bring Michael to the Farm for a Saturday in January. Michael met us at the tap room on Friday evening. We were lucky enough to share more of his delicious homebrews that evening and spend a little time chatting mostly about beer and family.  It was fun.  

  

 Saturday morning Brian and Michael met bright and early for a 15 bbl brew of his beer. Brian followed Michael’s recipe, scaling it up for our needs.  The plan was that if the beer turned out well,we would serve it at the Aleiversary. (So you already know how that part of the story ends.)  We tried our best to roll out the red carpet, and honestly, Michael volunteered to empty the mashtun. The brewed beer was sent to one of our 15 bbl tanks in the BARn brewery, and within 24 hours, it was doing this amazing and somewhat messy fermentation (luckily that slowed down after a few hours).  

Something like 200 fresh vanilla bean pods were split by our brewing staff after fermentation was complete. Then, Brick and Mortar Coffee in Springfield made us a special dark roast blend that we put on the beer for a short time.  Almost two months after Seventh Trumpet was brewed on the Piney River Farm, we kegged the beer to serve at the 5th Aleiversary. Where it turned out to be a big hit! 

There is a limited amount of Piney River’s Seventh Trumpet available at the BARn tap room.  We have pints, and we are filling Crowlers with the beer if you want to take some to go.  We were able to send a keg up to Michael to enjoy, too.  If you are joining us at Taps and Tastes at Boulevardia this year, we will be pouring up samples of Seventh Trumpet there, too.

Who knows if ther will be another Seventh Trumpet brewed at Piney River. We will definitely be adding an imperial stout to our lineup since we now have the tank space to give such a beer the time it needs.  A huge thanks to the Homebrewery for giving us the opportunity to meet Michel and brew his beer.  And an even bigger thanks to Michels for patiently waiting for us to brew the beer with him.  Michael’s goal is to win a homebrew competition in every state. There’s no doubt, Eye for an Eye is going to do that!   

While you have a chance, don’t miss out on the opportunity to enjoy Seventh Trumpet with us at the BARn before it’s gone. Cheers Michael, and cheers to all of you making homebrews!

 

Farm Brewer Wanted!

In The Beer on October 21, 2015 at 10:00 pm

brewcyrus on barnDo you love beer?  We may have a job for you!

We’re looking for a new team member on the Piney River Farm–a brewer!  Our brewers are paid well, and we take a lot of pride in work our team members do every day.  Brewing is hard work, but brewing excellent craft beer is also very rewarding.  And if you work for us, you get to live here!  In the Ozarks where the streams and trails abound.

Check out this job description.  If this sounds like something you are interested in, let us know why you’re passionate about beer and how you would fit on our team.

Job Description: Brewer

Summary:

Piney River Brewing is a packaging brewery in Bucyrus, Missouri. Our farm brewery is located in the heart of the Ozarks–the Mark Twain National Forest and the Ozarks National Scenic Riverways are our playground. Our mission is to produce high-quality beer that celebrates the Ozarks. Since opening our doors in 2011, our beer has won numerous awards including gold awards at GABF and the World Beer Cup.

In 2015, our 4th year of operation we will produce 2,000 barrels of beer. We have also moved into a new 12,000 square foot addition that includes a new 15 bbl brewhouse and an 8-head Wild Goose canning line. The move into the new facility has increased our capacity to 10,000 barrels.

The Brewer will report directly to the Owner/Head Brewer and will participate in all facets of brewhouse, cellar, packaging, and shipping operations as required. The Brewer will serve as a brand ambassador inside and outside the brewery.

The successful applicant will be both hard working and easy going with a positive can-do attitude and ability to work independently and collaboratively.

Requirements:

Brewing experience or brewing education.

Flexible work schedule that may include early mornings, late evening, and weekend shifts.

Strong communication skills and ability to maintain a positive attitude is critical.

Must be able to repetitively lift 60 lbs and move 165 lbs.

Must be able to work standing for 8-10 hours.

Must have excellent attention to detail and organization skills.

Proficient computer skills required.

Professional brewing education is a plus.

All interested candidates, please email resume to brian@pineyriverbrewing.com

Piney River Brewing Company is an equal opportunity employer.
All qualified individuals are encouraged to apply.

How Piney River Runs Through St. Louis

In The Beer on October 15, 2015 at 8:38 pm

A couple of years ago, Brian and I poured beer at Augusta Bottoms Bierfest. We met John Hummel from Summit Distributing for the first time at that festival.summit

Like many people in the St. Louis area, John and members of his family had found a little convenience store near St. Louis where they could sometimes find Piney River beer. They wanted more.

John had also heard about Piney River through the Missouri wholesale distributor network. He let us know that he would like a seat at the table when we began talking to distributors in the St. Louis area. I’m pretty sure that we had no clue when that conversation would ever take place.

St. Louis? That’s a huge market. St. Louis? They have lots of great craft beer there already. St. Louis? How could we ever possibly meet the demand?

Fast forward to spring 2014. We began looking at ways to meet our current distribution needs. There were lots of thing we knew: We need a new brewhouse. We need a bigger place to brew beer.  And if we had a bigger place to brew beer and a bigger brewhouse, we would also need all the other stuff…bigger cellar, bigger cooler, bigger canning line. And If we had all of that, what would that mean for the Piney River brand?

IMG_3094Earlier this year, we picked that conversation with John back up. It was a beautiful Friday in April at the BARn. John, Brian Dix and Ryan Carolan stood on the new concrete waiting for the construction of a bigger barn. They tried our beers. They listened to our story of brewing beer on the kitchen stove and hauling old hay out of a barn loft to winning a World Beer Cup.

IMG_3111About a month later, we visited Summit’s offices and warehouse in St. Louis. We met more of the Summit management team. John and Kim Barrow gave us a tour of the warehouse (Wow!), and we talked some more about how the Piney River brand could fit into the Summit portfolio.

Later this summer, a contract between Piney River and Summit was executed. More importantly, John and members of his team came back to the BARn in August. At Piney River, we believe in sharing beer while enjoying nature, and that’s exactly what we did.

With the Summit team, we drank beer, we floated and flipped our canoes on the Big Piney River, we drank some more beer, and we worked out a plan for Piney River to flow through St. Louis.

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For as long as we’ve been brewing beer in Missouri, we’ve had the craft beer lovers in St. Louis and Kansas City asking for our beer in their bars and restaurants and on their store shelves. For the first time in about five years, we have finally reached the point where we are able to brew enough beer to begin to meet the demand a large metropolitan area places on a brewery. With every batch of beer on our new system, we are able to quadruple the amount of beer we turn out.

Why St. Louis?

Our microbrewer, Andy, shows our team a little love.

Our microbrewer, Andy, shows our team a little love.

We love the Cardinals. We love the Missouri Botanical Gardens. And City Museum. And Ted Drewes.

Seriously, the reality is that we are only 2.5 hours from St. Louis, so that’s a little easier to work around with our first foray into a major metro area. Brian and I still try to be at and do as many events as possible. We love the opportunity to share a beer with the people that enjoy our beer.

With this brewery expansion and the ability to provide lots more beer to the good people in the Ozarks, we have hired our first salesperson. Yay for Rick Lange, and the ground he’s helping us cover! Rick will also help us in the St. Louis market.

We are working diligently to fill the orders our current distributors—Grellner Sales, Heart of America Beverage, NH Scheppers Distributing, Bluff City Beer Co., and Glidewell Distributing have placed with us. We hope to help all of them grow the Piney River brand in their respective markets. And we’re excited to add Summit Distributing to the Piney River family of distributors.

So, the cat’s out of the bag. Piney River will be available in St. Louis city, St. Louis County, St. Charles county and Lincoln county. You’ll find Piney River in cans and on draft in bars and restaurants and on shelves. And if you don’t see it, ask for it.

A huge thanks to John Hummel for his efforts to bring Piney River to St. Louis. We are really looking forward to working with the entire Summit Distributing team. This is really happening!  The first week of November, Summit Distributing is will spread a little bit of the Piney River Farm all over St. Louis.

The Piney River Farm

The Piney River Farm

So this happened…

In The Beer on October 14, 2015 at 12:15 pm

Our secret is out. Stay tuned. ALL the the details are coming soon.