Piney River Brewing Company

Posts Tagged ‘16 ounce canned beer’

Honey, I Shrunk the Piney River Cans

In The Beer on October 12, 2016 at 10:11 pm

Today was a cloudy, rainy day on the Piney River Farm; not too different from the cloudy, rainy night in 2011 when Piney River first canned craft beer in the Ozarks. Today’s first–12 ounce Piney River cans.

Those of us that have been canning beer on the Farm are still trying to adjust to these smaller cans in our hands, but we’re doing what many of our consumers and our distributors have asked us to do by putting our beer in a smaller can.

Waaay back in 2011 when Piney River was the first microbrewery in the state to can beer at their brewery, we were following suit with the 16-ounce pint can like our craft beer brothers and sisters in the Midwest—Tallgrass, Surly, Sun King. We’re in the Show Me state, why not show our customer a true pint? Plus, it was perfect—the Piney Pint.

Back then, there wasn’t much canned craft beer on the shelves in 2011 and 2012 or even 2013, but now canned beer is growing by leaps and bounds, and breweries that were once only bottling their beer are now canning it, too. Twelve-ounce cans are easier to source, plus, if you were a brewery already packing 12-ounce beers, it only makes sense to continue that in a can form. And now, it’s easier to find 12-ounce cans on the shelf here in the Ozarks than it is possible to find 16-ounce cans on the shelf.

I even had a conversation with a fellow brewer that packaged beer in 16-ounce cans and started packaging certain beers in 12-ounce cans for grocery stores. He thinks that it will ultimately lead to the demise of his 16-ounce canned beers.

Our distributors were also asking for 12-ounce cans from Piney River. For those distributors that sold 12-ounce/6-packs and 16-ounce/4-packs, they felt like they could sell more cases of 6-packs than 4-packs. Truly, a case of 6-packs equals four purchases to be empty the case, and a case of 4-packs require six purchases to empty the case. Plus, we’re hearing about this issue that the consumer can’t generally do the math that even though a 4-pack usually costs less than a 6-pack, all the consumer sees is 6 beers versus 4 beers.

And while we love floating down the Big Piney with pint of Piney in our koozie, we have heard from some of you that your 16-ounce beer gets warm before you finish it. Can we suggest here that you drink just a wee bit faster, perhaps? Just an idea….But never fear, your warm beer concerns have also been heard!

So, raise those Piney pints high in the air (or save them for your beer collection); either way, they are going away.

Today, we canned Piney River’s Black Walnut Wheat in 12-ounce cans, and that will be followed up by 12-ounce versions of all of our core beers in the coming weeks. Depending upon your distribution market and the stock of 16-ounce beers your distributor has in place, you will see 12-ounce 6-packs of Piney River beer in your favorite drink-buying place very soon or shortly down the road.

In the upcoming months, you will also see us release “Raise a Ruckus” (an Imperial Stout) and 2017 Mule Team Imperial IPA in 12-ounce 4-packs. We thought 10% ABV might be a little more easy drinking in the smaller sized can, and we can keep it at a good price point, too.

Four brands will remain in 16-ounce cans until we run out of the blank pounders. Masked Bandit IPA and Old Tom Porter are two brands you already know well. Two new Piney River offerings in 16-ounce 4-packs will be River Access Ozarks Lager and Aux Arcs Dry-Hopped Saison.

Same delicious Piney River beer. Same commitment to quality. Same love of what we do…just in a smaller package and lots more of them.

Cheers!

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Piney River Brewing Wins Gold Medal at the Great American Beer Festival®

In The Beer on October 14, 2013 at 12:20 pm

Piney River Brewing Company claimed a gold medal at the 2013 Great American Beer Festival (GABF) competition. Presented by the Brewers Association, GABF is the largest national beer competition that recognizes the most outstanding beers produced in the United States. The top three winners in the competition’s 84 beer-style categories were announced October 12 at the Great American Beer Festival awards ceremony held at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado. 

“Everyone at Piney River is overwhelmed and honored to bring home a gold medal from our small brewery here in the Ozarks,” Brian Durham, head brewer and co-founder at Piney River Brewing, said.

Piney River Brewing was recognized in the “brown porter” beer-style category for its Old Tom Porter a traditional English-style ale that features roasted malts that have chocolate and coffee flavors with a balanced hop profile.  The brewery recommends pairing Old Tom Porter with beef or grilled meats and homemade vanilla ice cream.

Durham developed the recipe for Old Tom Porter shortly after opening the Ozark brewery in 2011.

“We wanted to have a dark, full-bodied beer to go with other ales that we had in our tap room lineup,” Durham said. 

The beer’s name gives homage to the “old tom” American wild turkey, which is native to the Ozarks.   

“It’s not uncommon to hear a tom turkey’s gobble reverberating off the bluffs and hills around our farm and the brewery,” Durham said, explaining that his brewery staff and customers regularly watch wild turkeys foraging for spent grains in the manure the brewery cows spread around the farm.

“The old tom can be very elusive, and we wanted to honor the great wild turkey heritage we have in the Ozarks with our porter,” Durham said.

Piney River Brewing Company is a craft brewery located in the South Central Ozarks in Missouri.  The brewer specializes in craft beers that celebrate the Ozarks by highlighting the region’s limestone filtered water in their beers and packaging their craft brew in 16-ounce pint cans that are “portable in nature”.

“Since we opened our doors in March 2011, our goal has always been to brew high quality craft beers that celebrate the Ozarks,” Durham said.

Piney River Brewing is located on Durham’s 80-acre farm, operating out of a restored 70-year old barn.  Durham founded the brewery with his wife, Joleen, in 2010 with a 10-gallon brewing system.  The seven-barrel brewhouse and related packaging equipment went into full-time use in the fall of 2011.  The brewery has distribution throughout Central and Southwest Missouri and Arkansas. 

“This year was the first time Piney River has entered any brews in a national competition,” Durham explained.  “We are beyond excited to bring home this win to our little brewery and to shine the spotlight on the rural Ozarks with this gold medal.”

Durham applauded the efforts of his two brewers, Lucas Clem and Amber Powell.  “We could not have done this without them,” Durham said.

The 2013 GABF competition winners were selected by an international panel of 201 expert judges from the record number of 4,809 entries received from 745 U.S. breweries.

“The Great American Beer Festival brings together the most stellar brewers from around the country,” said Chris Swersey, competition director. “Taking home a medal at this premier beer competition is truly a symbol of brewing excellence.”

For more GABF competition information, including the 2013 winners list and photos, visit GreatAmericanBeerFestival.com. Additional information about Piney River Brewing can be found at www.pineyriverbrewing.com

Piney River Brewing received their gold medal at the 2013 Great American Beer Festival awards ceremony held in Denver on Saturday morning.  Shown here, left to right:  Lucas Clem, brewer; Charlie Papazian, president of the Brewer’s Association; Brian Durham, head brewer and co-founder; Joleen Durham, co-founder and original keg washing queen. Not present, Amber Powell, brewer.

Piney River Brewing received their gold medal at the 2013 Great American Beer Festival awards ceremony held in Denver on Saturday morning. Shown here, left to right: Lucas Clem, brewer; Charlie Papazian, president of the Brewer’s Association; Brian Durham, head brewer and co-founder; Joleen Durham, co-founder and original keg washing queen. Not present, Amber Powell, brewer.